Agri-Nutrition Consulting Gets a New Look

Agri-Nutrition Consulting Gets a New Look

Dear customers and friends, You may have noticed that Agri-Nutrition Consulting has recently made some updates to our company identity. That’s because we are looking towards the future. We’ve updated our brand to match our mission statement, “Going Beyond Nutrition through Innovative Solutions.” We are committed to exceeding expectations in both our service to you, and the line-up of products we offer. The first thing you’ll notice is we have updated our logo. This logo was designed to represent a swift “going beyond” motion. It also resembles an “A” shape, and the colors were updated to a darker shade of our core navy and red, to give the logo a more modern look. However, we know that a brand is more than just a logo. It’s our promise to you. We promise to stand behind our brand and mission statement, and to demonstrate our core values of honesty, dependability, innovation, respect, and consistency. Our core values statement is: With HONEST and DEPENDABLE work, ANC will be the leader in implementing INNOVATIVE products and solutions while maintaining the RESPECT and CONSISTENCY our customers expect from us. Whether you are new to ANC or have known us for 27 years, I encourage you to come discover our commitment to excellence. As you will see, our primary goal is to help our customers make the best management and nutrition decisions for their farms and keep their business profitable well into the future. Would you like to learn more about working with an ANC Consultant on your dairy or beef farm? Click here to see consultants in your area. Would you like to...

How to Milk the Most out of High Cheese and Butter Prices

This is a great time to be a dairy farmer.   In the last week to 10 days both cheese and butter hit record high prices on the CME.   The corn and soybean crops look like they could be record breaking as well.   This creates a rare situation of high milk prices and low feed prices and that is a formula for profit. How can you take advantage of the opportunities these markets create? Forages.  An abundant supply of high quality forage allows feeding more forage. High forage diets tend to support higher levels of fat and protein yield.   This could be the year to make more corn silage so that you can feed more forage. (Read more: 6 Key Advantages of Feeding High Forage Diets). Feed Bunk Management. Frequent feed delivery and feed push-ups discourage sorting and result in the production of higher component milk.  (Read more: 4 Dairy Management Factors that Have the Most Impact on Milk Production, Save Money!). TMR Mixer Maintenance.  Your rations are only as good as your TMR mixer and a mixer that is not working properly can result in acidosis and reduced fat and protein test.   At today’s record high prices for butter and cheese, spending money to maintain and repair TMR mixers is money well spent.   Approach with caution: Additives. There are several additives that can be put in the TMR that may increase milk components.   However, in many cases fine tuning feeding management offers more potential for increased profits than feeding an additive.   So before putting additives in your TMR evaluate your feed management and address areas that might be holding your cows...
Join Us in Going Beyond for Dairy!

Join Us in Going Beyond for Dairy!

World Dairy Expo is right around the corner.  This year ANC has some big plans to share with you.  We will be rolling out our brand new look, with the initiative to “go beyond nutrition” for farmers and for the dairy industry. As we are getting ready to roll-out our new look at World Dairy Expo, we wanted to spread the word about what we feel especially passionate about.  Going beyond nutrition, and going beyond for the dairy industry. You can help us spread the word by participating in our “I go beyond for dairy” campaign.  We want to showcase all of the ways farmers “go beyond for dairy,” to open the conversation between consultants and farmers about working together to create management programs, practices, and solutions that work best for each individual farms’ needs. We especially hope this campaign will bring awareness to those that may not be as familiar with today’s farming practices about the many ways farmers care for their animals every day, while providing safe and nutritious food for the world! Join the conversation online by using the hashtag #Igobeyondfordairy and mention @ANCAgNutrition, OR share your own photos, thoughts, and stories to eibergenc@agrinutrition.com.  Let’s spread the word about how farmers go beyond everyday to care for their animals!...

Know the Warning Signs for Rumen Acidosis in Dairy Cattle

Dairy cattle and other ruminants have a unique digestive system allowing them to digest feeds that are high in sources of fiber that are indigestible in the diets of non-ruminants.   The cow’s rumen plays a critically important role in digesting these high fiber feeds.   The rumen functions best when its pH is between 6.6 and 6.2.   When pH falls below 5.8, rumen function is compromised.   This condition is called acidosis. Acidosis is caused by the accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFA) in the rumen.   When a cow digests feed, her rumen produces acetate, butyrate, and propionate.  These compounds are absorbed by the rumen tissue and the cow utilizes them as energy sources.   When the production of these acids exceeds the cow’s ability to absorb them, her rumen pH drops.   If the production of these acids is rapid and her rumen pH falls between 5.2 and 5.8, she then experiences subacute rumen acidosis (SARA).   Figure 1. shows the swings in rumen pH over a 4-day period in a cow that experienced SARA.     This can be a common occurrence in dairy cattle.   The symptoms of SARA include:        Loose bubbly manure        Lower feed intake        Lost milk production        Lower milk component yield        Reduction in a cows ability to digest fiber        Loss of capacity of the rumen to absorb nutrients. Over time SARA can result in damage to the lining of the rumen, infections, liver accesses, and lameness.  This is a serious disease with a significant cost of $500 million to $1 billion/year to the dairy industry. When a cow’s rumen pH drops below 4.8 and remains below...