Pre-Harvest Handling to Preserve High Quality Beef Carcass

The goal of beef producers is to provide an appealing meat product to the consumer based off of the qualities set by the USDA. One of the biggest factors of maintaining carcass quality is how the beef cattle are handled. High stress situations negatively affect the animal’s welfare, and can greatly decrease the value of the meat. Pre-processing handling is just as important as on the farm handling of the animals, even though the cattle are not at the processing plant for very long. Rough handling, on or off the farm, can double the extent of bruising found on the carcass, by stressing the cattle out to the point of falling and/or colliding. Some good techniques to use when herding cattle through the chutes or corrals is to use the point of balance located by their front shoulder, and the flight zone. The point of balance technique uses the cattle’s natural need to move the opposite way of people as an advantage. Hot shots should not be the primary tool to move animals, but may be used as a last resort. According to Dr. Temple Grandin from Colorado State University, handlers should never twist the tail of the animal or beat them to make them move. Paddles and flags are more the appropriate tools to direct small groups of cattle to the designated area. To further decrease the stress levels, the handlers can limit visual distractions, such as removing  hanging chains and covering parts of the chutes. Another point to bring to attention is that cattle prefer leaving a dark area to a lighter one. This can be done by...

Welcoming our new marketing and sales intern Kayla Marks

Kayla Marks is the 2015 summer marketing intern for Agri-Nutrition Consulting LLC.  For the next few months, she will be assisting in various projects, such as blogging, writing and designing news articles, researching new technologies, and updating ANC’s media’s and literature. In addition to obtaining testimonials from clients in the area, she will be aiding in promotional events for ANC and its products. She will be graduating at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville in spring of 2016, with an Animal Science major, Biology minor, and an emphasis in Science. She has worked for the university as a Resident Assistant for the past 3 years. Since she moved to Platteville, WI, she has been able to travel and experience what the Mid-West has to offer. Kayla has been to Florida, Indiana, Kentucky, Minnesota, Nebraska, Missouri, and many other neighboring states. Kayla was born and raised in Woodland, CA, where she raised and showed registered Dorset sheep for over 10 years, as well as raised a few champion hogs and a boar goat. During that time she was involved with Future Farmers of America (FFA), 4-H, National Honors Society, California Wool Growers Association, and the Continental Dorset Association. “We are very excited to welcome Kayla to the ANC team this summer,” says Connie Eibergen, ANC Marketing Coordinator.  “She brings a positive passion for agriculture, and has had many agricultural leadership experiences that make her a great fit for this role.”...

6 tips for minimizing heat stress on your dairy

Minimizing heat stress is a goal of every dairyman. Tunnel or cross ventilated barns have given us a cow comfort standard that we can try to attain in many barns. There have been improvements in air movement and sprinkler systems in most dairies. But what else can we do?  1. Feeding more digestible forages. Low quality forages stay in rumen longer and produce more heat than high quality forages. Target these mineral levels in summer: Potassium                          >1.5% Sodium                                 .4-.55% Chloride                                <.35 DCAD                                   At least 300 meq/Kg 2. Lowering stocking density.  If possible, especially in pre- and post-fresh pens. This will help reduce metabolic disease incidence. 3. Provide shade. Cows under stress are light sensitive and bunch up in areas away from sunlight.  Shade cloth on outside walls or lowering the lower curtain can allow cows to spread out. 4. Feed multiples time a day. Feeding multiple times a day will keep fresh feed in front of cows and ensure adequate feed at night as cows will eat more in cooler temperatures. 5. Water. Waterers need to be cleaned more often in hot weather. Access to water immediately after milking is more important than ever. 6. Bovine BlueLite. Bovine BlueLite lowers body temperature and assists in rehydration. This can be fed all summer...