Lopez joins ANC as Nutrition Consultant/Technical Specialist

Marco Lopez of Boise, Idaho has joined Agri-Nutrition Consulting (ANC) as a Nutrition Consultant and Technical Specialist in March 2016. Marco grew up in Central Mexico. Dairy farming was part of his life while growing up around his grandparent’s farm in Mexico. In 1991, he moved to the state of Washington where he had the opportunity to continue working on dairy farms while attending high school and college. Upon graduation from Washington State University with a Bachelor of Science in Animal Sciences, Marco spent time in Minnesota and Michigan working as a Territory/Market Manager for Monsanto’s Dairy Business Unit. Marco later joined Varied Industries Corporation (Vi-COR) as a Dairy Specialist providing technical support to Sales Managers, dairy producers and agribusiness in the Eastern United States. Marco has experience consulting in Western Europe, Mexico, Canada and the Caribbean. He has worked with dairies ranging in size from a few cows to multi-site dairy operations milking 10,000+ cows. Marco’s goal in his position with ANC is to provide quality consulting services to help producers advance forward to reach the next level of profitability, animal health and employee performance through innovative solutions, results-proven products and the most up-to-date technical information and training. He believes that healthy cows are productive cows and competent and well trained employees are valuable employees. Along with a team of experienced in-house nutritionist and his dairy management experience, Marco will be a valuable asset to ANC’s growing/expanding business in the Pacific Northwest as well as a resource to the ANC team of consultants across the United States. Marco currently lives in Boise, Idaho with his wife Nancy and...

Common Alfalfa Dilemmas and How to Solve Them

Spring is rapidly approaching and with spring brings a new set of tasks to be accomplished and decisions that must be made on your farm. Checking alfalfa fields for winter damage is one of those tasks that is really easy to overlook, but always time well spent. Maybe it gets passed over because we feel guilty spending time on a nice day just walking around the fields, and it does not feel like work. Determining Yield Potential One of the first things you can do in the spring once the plants start to green up is do a plant count to determine if there is good yield potential. According to Dan Undersander at the University of Wisconsin, it is more accurate to count stems per square foot than plants per square foot to evaluate yield potential. Anything greater than 40 stems per square foot represents a healthy stand that has potential to yield well. If your field has less than 39 stems per square foot you should do something to increase yield on that field. Here is one of those alfalfa dilemmas. What is the best thing to do with a poor stand? There are many options depending on your forage inventory situation. The most common solution to this problem is to rotate the hayfield out and plant corn on that field. If you are in need of the alfalfa and not ready to rotate, there are several other options to consider to increase yield. For example, if you seeded grass with your alfalfa and there is still a good amount of grass present, all you need to do...

Kuntz Joins ANC as Nutrition Consultant – Findlay, OH

Chris Kuntz joined the ANC team as a Nutrition Consultant in February 2016.  Chris grew up on a hobby farm with cattle, chickens, horses, and alpacas where they also custom bailed hay.  He also has experience in grain farming, livestock, and raising hogs. After high school, Chris’s grandfather loaned him money to buy a couple of feeders to finish out.  He realized he wanted to try the cow-calf business and bought five cow-calf pairs.  Chris discovered that was something he wanted to take to the next level and began re-investing in his business’ growth . Chris and his family now have an Angus herd of about 65 head of cattle, and their operation continues to grow. “Chris brings a strong desire to learn and to be a difference-maker with our progressive company in the central Ohio area.  We will be utilizing our team of dairy and beef nutritionists at ANC to help farmers to ‘go beyond’. Chris will be actively networking with an area mill, industry partners and prospects to grow our core business.  We are pleased to have Chris on our team at ANC and looking forward to great things ahead,” says Jay Hoffman, Assistance General Manager for Agri Nutrition Consulting. Chris’s goal in his position at ANC is to provide customers with the best service possible to improve their operations and nutrition, to allow them to provide a better end product to the market, whether this is through milk, beef, or pork....

Indoor calf pen walk-throughs: What you need to look for

Many times when I’m walking calves on a farm, an employee will ask, “So, what are you looking at anyway?” I’m looking for sick calves using a simple method to quickly assess the health status of each calf. Start small Always start with the youngest calves and work your way to the oldest calves to prevent spread of disease from older calves to the newborns. Slowly walk past each pen and quickly assess the items below. When the calves are in group pens, go through the same basic approach. Take the time to look at each calf. If anything catches your eye, stop and watch the calf to get a more thorough evaluation. Make a note of the calf’s number and share any concerns with the owner or manager. While most of the calves noted are already being treated on the best-managed herds, occasionally you will come up with one that was doing well at last check and looks “off” when you walk through. On some herds, the managers or employees struggle to identify sick calves, and it’s a great opportunity to talk about early symptoms. Attitude is everything The first glance tells a lot about the calf. A healthy calf interacts with her environment. She should show interest in you when you approach. She should look at you and follow your movement with her eyes as you walk by. A sick calf will be slow to notice you, probably not show interest in your movement and generally look depressed. In a group pen, healthy calves will be with the herd and show interest in each other and you...